Glossary
Accessories
Accessories

Accessories
An interchangeable term for additional ornamentation associated with an ensemble. Accessories often contribute to creating a more fashionable or dimensional look. Often used to describe everything from belts, scarves and socks to sunglasses, jewelry, watches etc.

 

Anorak
Anorak

Anorak
The anorak is a waterproof, hooded jacket with drawstrings at the waist and cuff. While the hood is fur lined, the jacket itself is stuffed with down feathers or a very warm synthetic fiber.

 

Aviators
Aviators

Aviators
A sunglasses silhouette originally developed for military pilots, hence the name. The classic teardrop shaped eyeglasses with metal frames, and often tinted lenses, contoured to suggest the goggles once worn by aviators.

 

Balance
Balance

Balance
Often the scale on which the success of a finished coat is measured. The length at the front and the back of the jacket should be parallel. This balance is very much dependent on the shoulders fitting the individual properly.

 

Bespoke
Bespoke

Bespoke
A term often applied in variety, bespoke tailoring is distinct from ‘ready-to-wear’. Cut from an individual paper pattern, suits are crafted by hand (and often entirely from the same cloth) with the customer’s specific requirements and customizations in mind.

 

Black Tie
Black Tie

Black Tie
A type of semiformal attire worn by men and distinguished from white tie. Generally speaking a black bowtie, a tailored tuxedo jacket and cummerbund are to be worn for this occasion.

 

Boat shoes
Boat shoes

Boat Shoes
Traditionally constructed with a canvas or leather upper, boat shoes feature rubber soles with a sipping pattern cut into them, which enhances grip on a wet boat deck. Other defining features include a lace-up fastening and lace detailing threaded around the side of the shoe.

 

Boot cut
Boot cut

Bootcut
A by-product of the acid house rise, shapely denim cut loosely at the hem to accommodate a boot. The style is flared/loose all the way down, unlike women’s jeans, which are often tapered at the knee.

 

Bow tie
Bow tie

Bow Tie
The modern bow tie is most commonly associated with dinner suits. The style comprises of fabric tied in a shoelace knot around the collar to create symmetrical loops at the two opposite ends.

 

Boxer briefs
Boxer briefs

Boxer Briefs
A hybrid of the boxer short and brief. Boxer briefs are long in the leg but tight in fit along the thigh.

 

Boxer shorts
Boxer shorts

Boxer Shorts
The loosest undergarment a man can choose. Characterized by an elastic waist similar to those seen on the trunks of boxing athletes.

 

Brogue
Brogue

Brogue
a durable, comfortable, low-heeled shoe, often having decorative perforations and a wing tip. Usually tanned leather shoe once worn in Ireland and Scotland.

 

Briefs
Briefs

Briefs
Close-fitting, legless underpants with an elastic waistband.

 

Button-down collar
Button-down collar

Button-down Collar
The shirt’s points are fastened down with small non-decorative buttons on the front of the shirt. Despite considered in some menswear circles as a sporting style, it is rarely worn with a suit.

 

Cable knit
Cable knit

Cable Knit
Refers to a pattern commonly used in men’s jumpers and knitted accessories in which raised ‘cables’ appear to twist around one another. The method lends itself to creating textured, layered looks popular in the autumn/winter seasons. Currently trending: cable knits on chunky roll necks.

 

Cardigan
Cardigan

Cardigan
A sweater that opens like a jacket and that is fastened in the front with buttons.

 

Chalk stripe
Chalk stripe

Chalk Stripe
Vertical lines on suit fabric, designed to look like the color of tailor’s chalk. The lines are subtle and hazy compared to the crisp, distinct lines of pinstripe.

 

Chelsea boots
Chelsea boots

Chelsea Boot
Chelsea Boots, also as riding boot jodhpur boots or paddock boots, are tight-fitting, ankle-high boots that originated in the Victorian era, and were first used for horse riding. The most notable feature of the Chelsea boot is its elastic siding, running from just above the welt to the top of the shoe.

 

Chino cloth
Chino cloth

Chino (Cloth)
A twill fabric generally made of cotton or a cotton blend.
Most commonly used to construct trousers, which are widely known as ‘chinos’. The trousers have become a staple within men’s fashion and should be considered an essential part of a modern wardrobe. They come available in a wide variety of neutral and bold colors, as well as statement prints and patterns.

 

Chukka boots
Chukka boot

Chukka Boot
Ankle boots with two or three high lacings to hold them together.
Customarily made from suede or calfskin, the chukka boot has also been found in adaptations from dressier black leather to exotic crocodile skin.

 

Collars
Collars

Collars
Unlike lapels shirt collars are constructed from a separate fabric. The spread of the collar refers to the distance between the two points of a shirt collar. The stand is the band, often on the widest part, that supports the collar. The corners of the collar are known as the points. This is where the most variation applies. Collar stiffeners, are rigid strips inserted to the underside of the collar to prevent the points from curling up.

 

Corduroy
Corduroy

Corduroy
A cotton fabric composed of twisted fibers that, when woven, lie parallel to each other. This helps to form the fabric’s distinct ‘cord’ pattern, which runs either horizontally or vertically.

 

Crew neck
Crew neck

Crew Neck
A garment of function, the rounded, no collar, neckline was adopted on t-shirts as an undergarment by the U.S Navy to absorb sweat.

 

Cummerbund
Cummerbund

Cummerbund
A component of black tie dress. The cummerbund is a broad, pleated waistband worn with single-breasted dinner jackets. The word cummerbund comes from the Persian kamar (waist) + band (band).

 

Dak strap/side adjuster
Dak straps/side adjuster

Daks Strap / Side Adjuster
A narrow strip of flexible material, especially leather, as for fastening or holding things together generally seen on pants.

 

Dinner jacket
Dinner jacket

Dinner Jacket
Etiquette believes ‘dinner jacket’ to be formally correct over ‘tuxedo’, although the terms are often interchanged by the unaware. Defined by the satin facings on the lapels mirrored on the outer seams of the dinner suit trousers.

 

Double breasted
Double breasted

Double-breasted
A suit or blazer jacket with wide, overlapping front flaps and two parallel columns of buttons. More often than not, the first column is for ornamentation, the second is for fastening the jacket.

 

Drop crotch
Drop crotch

Drop Crotch
An exaggerated low rise applied to jeans to alter the silhouette of a look. Arguably a by-product of designers looking to focus on a relaxed hang to contrast against the commonplace skinny fits. Best worn on a young frame. Or not at all.

 

Duffle coat
Duffle coat

Duffle coat
A hooded, knee-length coat made from duffle; a coarse, thick woolen material.

 

Espadrille
Espadrille

Espadrille
Casual, canvas or cotton fabric shoes with a flexible sole made of jute rope.

 

Fair isle
Fair isle

Fair Isle
Intricate, highly colored knits, often stitched in bands, seen on jumpers, cardigans and more recently, accessories. The design takes its name from the Fair Isle, a tiny island in the north of Scotland where the practice originated.

 

Gingam check
Gingam check

Gingham Check
Plain-woven fabric featuring alternating checks, typically white and colored. Most commonly found on men’s shirts.

 

Herringbone
Herringbone

Herringbone
A chevron pattern often found in a wool twill fabric. The pattern is created by the way the fabric is woven. Tweed cloth is usually woven with a herringbone pattern.

 

Houndstooth
Houndstooth

Houndstooth
Distinctive broken checks – often in black and white – resembling a dog’s incisor. Also known as ‘dogstooth’.

 

Jeans
Jeans are casual trousers made from denim: a rugged cotton twill. Terms you’ll encounter when shopping for jeans include those relating to the cut (straight, skinny, slim, boot), the fabric (dry, raw, selvedge) and more recently the rise.

 

Lace ups
Lace ups

Lace-ups
A men’s shoe fastened with laces, obviously.

 

Lapel
Lapel

Lapel
Most commonly found on formal clothing. Lapels describe the folded flaps of cloth on the front of a jacket or coat.
The cloth is an extension of the collar and folds back against the breast and cut to create a step (notch), peak or shawl finish. Double-breasted jackets always have peak or shawl lapels.

 

Linen
Linen

Linen
A textile made from the fibers of the flax plant. Stronger and sturdier than cotton but does not hold dye well. Linen is often found in white or cream summer suits. When woven in to garments, it is valued for its exceptional coolness and freshness in hot weather. Characterized by its natural wrinkles that can add a natural charm to any look.

 

Loafer
Loafer

Loafer
Any true man of style will own at least one pair; the Holy Grail being a Gucci, patent horse-bit loafers. Despite once being labeled casual-only, styles can now be found up and down the formality spectrum – from tasseled to penny and driving, in leather, and suede and nubuck; all perpetually lace less and eternally rakish.

 

Mac
Mac

Mac
The Mackintosh (or Macintosh), mac in its unabbreviated form, is a form of waterproof raincoat made out of rubberized fabric.

 

Mandras
Madras

Madras
Vibrant plain-weave fabric. The lightweight plaid was originally hand woven but with modern techniques the pattern tends to bleed into one another. Typically used for men’s blazers, shirts and shorts.

 

Nap
Nap

Nap
The raised surfaces found projecting from a fabric; produced intentionally (by brushing) or naturally (during weaving). Fabrics such as flannel and saxony wool are often napped. The soft piles are created to provide extra warmth and comfort in the garment.

 

Patent
Patent

Patent
Black leather finished to a hard glossy surface (used chiefly for shoes and clothing accessories). The leather got its name from the U.S. Patent Office, as the leather’s finish was once protected by patent.Peak Lapel
The peak lapel creates an upward point towards the shoulder; emphasizing the already dramatic ‘V’ silhouette (especially when used on double-breasted cuts) and helping elongating the wearer’s frame.

 

Pinstripe
Pinstripe

Pinstripe
Narrow, crisp lines running in parallel, found in cloth often used for suiting.

 

Raw denim
Raw denim

Raw Denim
Essentially unwashed and untreated after the dyeing process. Dry denim is at its very best in a raw state. Due to its unfinished condition, over time knees, thighs, ankles and crotch will develop organic distress and fading.

 

Raw Edge
This describes the unsewn edge of a piece of fabric. Commonly seen on t-shirts at the neck, arms and hem. The technique produces a raw, rolled effect, finishing with an unstructured look.

 

Rise
Rise

Rise
The distance from the crotch to the top of the waistband in jeans and trousers. Common options include high, medium and low rise.

 

Seersucker
Seersucker

Seersucker
A mid to lightweight fabric, often striped, used to make clothing for spring and summer wear. A puckered or crinkled effect is created by releasing the tension at intervals during weaving.
This permanent effect holds the cloth away from the skin and makes it cool to wear.

 

Selvedge (Denim)
Reinforced fabric weave, typically found in unwashed or raw denim, to form a clean natural edge that does not unravel. Raw denim characterizes the wash while selvedge refers to the outside edge of the fabric. Selvedge denim carries a self-edge that will never fray and is therefore usually higher in quality and more expensive than other denims.

 

Shawl lapel
Shawl lapel

Shawl Lapel
The cut runs continuously from the back of the neck down to the buttons on the front of the torso without breaks or points.

 

Shirt cuffs
Shirt cuffs

Shirt Cuffs
No explanation needed

 

Shearling
Shearling

Shearling
A desired fleece for winter coats, hats and gloves. Sheep or lambskin tanned with the wool attached. The wool lined hide offers a rugged appeal and ultimate warmth.

 

Single breast
Single breast

Single-Breasted
In contrast to double-breasted, this cut is characterized as a narrow overlap fastened with a single row of buttons; always left over right. The narrow line is accentuated by the use of one to four buttons. To avoid mis-buttoning, follow this concise guide:
On a two-button jacket, make use only of the top.
Where three are on display, use either the middle (only) or top two. In the unlikely case you’re faced with four, leave just the bottom undone.

 

Spread collar
Spread collar

Spread Collar
This style gives prominence to the tie knot. Dictated by the distance between each point (often between 3 and 6 inches). The larger spreads are often referred to as a Windsor collar, named after the Duke of Windsor.

 

Straight collar
Straight collar

Straight Collar
This generic collar, measures 2 to 3 inches between the points.

 

Suede
Suede

Suede
Although used in generality to describe any fabric with a velvet-like finish, suede refers to the inside or flesh side of leather, which is brushed to produce a nap.

 

Tab collar
Tab collar

Tab Collar
Before the everyday anatomy of shirts lengthened itself to incorporate stiffeners, many sought a collar that provided an all the more put together look. Electing for a tab collar ensures the shirt’s points are held together by a strip of fabric that sits under the knot of a tie.

 

Tie pin bar
Tie pin bar

Tie Pin/ bar
An ornamental pin designed to hold the position of a necktie or cravat.

 

Vent
Vent

Vent
A vent is a cut/slit in the bottom (tail) of a coat, allowing the material to move more easily when being worn. A center vent is one common option, while vent-less side or double-vented are others.

 

White tie
White tie

White Tie
The chief components for men are the black dress coat commonly known as an evening tailcoat, white bow tie, white waistcoat and starched wing collar shirt.